An average of 1,000 people in the United States need emergency care treatment for serious dog bite-related injuries daily. Contrary to popular belief, a dog’s breed has little to do with its likelihood to attack. A dog can be inclined to act out for several reasons—a poor upbringing, immersion in a stressful situation, fear or frequent violent conditions.

While you may be able to avoid situations of this nature, you could just as easily be in the “wrong place at the wrong time.” If you are in a situation where you feel threatened by a potential dog attack, remember the following guidelines from The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS):

  • Resist the impulse to scream and run away
  • Remain motionless, hands at your sides, and avoid eye contact with the dog
  • Once the dog loses interest in you, slowly back away until the dog is out of sight
  • If the dog does attack, “feed” him your jacket, purse, bicycle, or anything that you can put between yourself and the dog
  • If you fall or are knocked to the ground, curl into a ball with your hands over your ears and remain motionless, and try not to scream or roll around

Having a violent interaction with a dog can be scary; receiving the representation you deserve doesn’t have to be. With our expertise, you can stay focused on your stress-free journey to recovery.